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Falling Off The Wagon


Why do I want the brownie?


I want the brownie because it's soft, warm, gooey, and delicious.


I thought to myself “The brownies are in the kitchen, go ahead and get one. You had a good day, and you deserve the brownie. It’s not a big deal”.


But it is a big deal because after I eat the brownie I will be mad at myself for giving in again and eating something that's "bad".


And then...


Worry will set in as my thoughts start to swirl. "Sugar causes cancer, will my tumor come back? Will a new one start? Will I get diabetes? Am I making myself sick?"


Then the shame... "What’s wrong with me? Why did I eat the brownie? Why can’t I just eat healthy?


Of course, there will be frustration... "I have no control. I’m my own worst enemy."


Anger, worry, shame, and frustration... all because I decided to eat a brownie.


This is a real example of the mental and emotional anguish I used to experience on a regular basis when it came to food. It was overwhelmingly stressful and completely unnecessary.


What are the consequences of carrying this mental and emotional weight?


Negative thoughts lead to negative emotions, which can make us feel stressed, anxious, and depressed. This can lead to unhealthy behaviors, such as overeating or binge eating. It can also damage our self-esteem and make it difficult to enjoy life.


In other words, putting myself through mental and emotional torture was significantly more toxic than eating the darn brownie.


So many people struggle with negative thoughts about food. But it's possible to break the cycle and have control so you can eat in peace.


The first step to overcoming emotional eating is to challenge your negative thoughts:

  1. Stop referring to food as good or bad. Food is food. It doesn't have a moral code.

  2. Say, "So what?". This will squash your inner critic any time you consciously decide to enjoy a brownie or any other indulgent pleasure food. You're not bad because you ate a brownie.

  3. Own your choices. You will take your power back when you quit blaming food (and yourself) and acknowledge that you're in charge of your choices.

If you're struggling with emotional eating, I encourage you to try one of these tips. Let me know how it goes!


xo,

Amy


P.S. If you would like to learn more, let's chat. Schedule a discovery call here or send an email to amy@amyenglishcc.com.

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